In House Laboratory

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Who says BIGGER facilities have better equipment?

Blood Testing:

Biochemistry/ Hematology: A subject we all learnt in school, rings a bell? Exploring the chemical process? Living organisms? Solving biological problems? Ringing a bell? We have the best in class machine that we leave the guessing work to, are vets just read the result, interpret them and act on them…… machine usually prepares the data in 10 mins, we make sure to feed the machine as many chemicals/reagents it needs, truly a white elephant, one of a kind, we cannot do without.

Fight the disease by doing regular tests.....

1

Complete Blood Count (CBC) and Other Blood Tests

Blood samples are usually taken by the veterinarian or a veterinary technician for analysis. There are three main parts of the CBC dedicated to providing information about red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

2

Stool Tests

The purpose of using certain fluids before stool examination is to detect the presence of the cysts of parasites such as Giardia and Cryptosporidium or eggs of other parasites, such as roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms. Larva, adult worms, or tapeworm segments may also be observed.

3

Urine Tests

Chemical analysis of urine includes determining its specific gravity (density), pH (degree of acidity or alkalinity), amounts of protein, glucose, fragmented blood cells, and more.

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Why did we go ahead with IDEXX?

IDEXX Small Animal Health provides diagnostic products and services to veterinary practices, including state-of-the-art pet-side tests and bench-top laboratory systems, and more.

This ladies and gentelmen….. and furchildren is our little 10 minute secret, we take a blood specimine from the animal, put in into a tube, feed it to the machine and then it SPITS out the result………….! Now wasn’t that a piece of CAKE?

The complicated part lies here:

Our competent lab assistant hands over the result to our vets, by email, physical copy and a copy in the internal vet application, so there is no chance of our VETs not reading it, unless they have forgotten their glasses at home 🙂 making sure the animal is thoroughly diagnosed.